The Maneater

MU freshman charged with crime motivated by discrimination

Bradley Becker was charged with second degree property damage motivated by discrimination on April 21 in connection with anti-Semitic vandalism in Mark Twain Hall.

MU freshman Bradley Becker, who was arrested in connection with anti-Semitic vandalism in Mark Twain Hall April 8 and 9, was charged with a crime motivated by discrimination by Boone County Prosecuting Attorney’s office.

He is scheduled for a preliminary hearing at 9:30 a.m. June 23 in the Division XI Courtroom, according to the Office of State Courts Administrator.

The vandalism was written with what appeared to be charcoal, including images of a swastika, a triangle with an eye on top and the word “heil.”

When arrested on April 21, Becker was charged with second degree property damage motivated by discrimination, according to an MU Police Department news release. Becker’s case was then sent to Prosecuting Attorney Dan Knight and the Boone County Prosecuting Attorney’s office, who determines if charges should be filed.

At the end of May, Becker was officially charged with second degree property damage motivated by discrimination.

The charge is a class D felony under section 557.035 of the Missouri Revised Statutes, which describes discrimination as dealing with “race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation or disability of the victim or victims.”

MU spokesman Christian Basi said in an April 13 Maneater article before Becker was arrested that if the student was caught and investigated by the Office of Student Conduct, the student could receive sanctions ranging from a verbal warning to expulsion from the university. It is unclear at this time whether Student Conduct has investigated Becker.

Residential Life Director Frankie Minor said in an April 13 Maneater article that this type of discriminatory language creates an unwelcoming environment that won’t be tolerated by the university.

“If you look at our mission statement, it’s providing a safe and inclusive community for everybody,” Minor said. “We’re working very hard to make sure that everybody feels safe and included in their community.”

Senior Thalia Sass, president of the Jewish Student Organization, said in an April 13 Maneater article that these incidents cause her personal concern.

“It becomes harder to show my Jewish identity,” she said. “I’m so proud to be a Jewish student on this campus. I’m so proud to flaunt my Jewish identity, but when incidents like this happen, it’s scary. This person doesn’t know me, but they hate me just because of the single aspect that I’m Jewish.”

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